Lab Members

Aubrey Wank's picture

Aubrey Wank. I am a sixth year in the clinical psychology PhD program and am in the neuropsychology track. I received my Bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Connecticut. Post-graduation, I conducted memory research on medial temporal lobe amnesia at the Memory Disorders Research Center (Boston University and Boston VA Healthcare System). Currently, my research is broadly examining autobiographical memory in normal cognitive aging. I am focusing on how the mental search for specific autobiographical memories may differ in cognitively normal, older individuals and what the impact of these age-related effects may be on the overall process of retrieving specific autobiographical memories. I hope to use both behavioral and neuroimaging methods, and recruit other neuropsychological populations (e.g., acquired brain injury and mild cognitive impairment) to better understand the underlying mechanisms of mental search and the possible distinguishing features of autobiographical memory in normal and abnormal aging.


Mónica Acevedo-Molina. My name is Mónica Acevedo-Molina and I am a fifth-year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology PhD program in the neuropsychology tract. I received my bachelor's degree from the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras, where I majored in Psychology. After I graduated from college, I was elected to participate in the Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) from the University of Iowa. As a PREP scholar, I conducted Alzheimer's disease research in a neuropsychology lab. As a graduate student in the Human Memory Lab, I am researching the influence of emotion on future thinking among healthy older and younger adults. Ultimately, I would like to research the influence of emotion on other aspects of cognition (e.g., memory) among individuals with neurodegenerative disease. 


McVeigh

Katelyn McVeigh. I am a third-year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program, Neuropsychology track. I received my Bachelor’s degree in Psychological Science from the University of Arizona in May of 2018. After graduation, I worked in the Clinical Trials Department at Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix. I helped conduct treatment and prevention studies for older adults, ranging from healthy individuals to those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease/dementia. Currently, I am interested in researching memory in normal and pathological aging through the use of brain imaging, neuropsychological assessment, and cognitive intervention strategies. Particularly, looking at methods for earlier detection of cognitive decline in older adults who are at risk for developing a neurodegenerative disease.


Trish

Trish Chilton. My name is Trish Chilton, and I am a second year graduate student in the social and cognitive neuroscience programs.  I received my Master of Science degree in Gerontology from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro where my primary focus involved person centered care methods for memory impaired older adults, including reminiscence therapy and life story review.  During my time in the program, I worked with newly diagnosed memory impaired, and Alzheimer’s disease patients and their families through a series of support groups and brain training exercise groups at the Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.  Additionally, my interest in intergenerational relationships and well being led to the formation of a high school service learning club where students engaged in creative and interpersonal activities with residents of local memory care facilities.  My current research interests involve wisdom and meaningful aging, and in particular how wisdom shaped through life experience might be transmitted between generations through intergenerational relationships, interactions and programs.  Could this interaction help to ameliorate ageism while promoting a more purposeful aging experience?  Would exploring the positive aspects of aging, such as generativity and the meaningful outcomes of wisdom aid in changing negative biases of aging?  I hope to use this research to add to the current literature on wisdom and aging, and to introduce interdisciplinary, interactive curriculums that explore rethinking aging stereotypes while encouraging critical thinking on how people age, how they want to age, and what that might look like going forward into mid-21st century.


mariam

Mariam Hovhannisyan. I am a graduate student in the clinical psychology PhD program in the neuropsychology track at the University of Arizona. I received my Bachelor’s degree in Cognitive Science from UCLA where I worked in Dr. Alan Castel's lab on studies involving metacognition and memory. I then conducted research on aging and memory using TMS, EEG, and DWI at Duke University working with Dr. Simon Davis. Currently, I work with Drs. Matt Grilli and Jessica Andrews-Hanna on projects involving memory, aging, imagination, and neuroimaging. 


austin

Austin Deffner. I am currently a Project Coordinator for the Human Memory Lab. I received my bachelor’s degree in Psychological Science from the University of Arizona in 2020. During my undergraduate studies, I worked as a bartender, volunteered for Elder Rehab at the JCC, and volunteered here in the Human Memory Lab as a research assistant. I look forward to eventually perusing a Doctorate of Audiology and potentially perusing a PhD after some experience with the clinical side of the field. Currently, I am interested in the relationship between cognitive impairment and hearing loss/tinnitus and the effectiveness of the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) in different populations.


 

Alumni

griffith

Chris Griffith. Chris was a Project Coordinator from 2019-2021. Currently he is a clinical psychology PhD student at University of Colorado Colorado Springs.

Thayer

Sean Thayer. Sean was a Project Coordinator from 2019-2021. Currently he is a graduate student at George Mason University where he is studying Human Factors and Applied Cognition.

Anna Robertson

Anna Robertson. Anna was a Project Coordinator from 2018-2019. Currently she is a clinical psychology PhD student at University of Colorado Colorado Springs.